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NATO signs accession protocols for Finland and Sweden as Ukraine faces shelling in east – The Washington Post
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NATO signs accession protocols for Finland and Sweden as Ukraine faces shelling in east – The Washington Post 

She helped get Trump elected. Now she’s raising crypto for Ukraine.
Donetsk governor urges 350,000 residents to flee
Analysis: A growing movement against illegal war
Russia could ban transit of goods through Baltic states, Kaliningrad governor says
Russian-held area in southern Ukraine to sell grain to Middle East
Russian forces make ‘substantive progress’ in bid to control Donbas, U.K. says
At least 2 killed in Russian missile strikes on Slovyansk, officials say
Yum Brands, parent company of KFC and Pizza Hut, moves closer to Russia exit
Russia passes initial vote on war economy measures
Ukrainian woman wins prestigious Fields Medal for mathematics
Ikea launches online fire sale in Russia, weeks after announcing exit
‘Terrified’ Brittney Griner urges Biden to push for her freedom
Ukraine needs ‘colossal funds’ to rebuild, Zelensky says
After invasion of Ukraine, a reckoning on Russian influence in Austria
Ukrainian flag raised over Snake Island, Ukraine’s military says
She helped get Trump elected. Now she’s raising crypto for Ukraine.
Donetsk governor urges 350,000 residents to flee
Analysis: A growing movement against illegal war
Russia could ban transit of goods through Baltic states, Kaliningrad governor says
Russian-held area in southern Ukraine to sell grain to Middle East
Russian forces make ‘substantive progress’ in bid to control Donbas, U.K. says
At least 2 killed in Russian missile strikes on Slovyansk, officials say
Yum Brands, parent company of KFC and Pizza Hut, moves closer to Russia exit
Russia passes initial vote on war economy measures
Ukrainian woman wins prestigious Fields Medal for mathematics
Ikea launches online fire sale in Russia, weeks after announcing exit
‘Terrified’ Brittney Griner urges Biden to push for her freedom
Ukraine needs ‘colossal funds’ to rebuild, Zelensky says
After invasion of Ukraine, a reckoning on Russian influence in Austria
Ukrainian flag raised over Snake Island, Ukraine’s military says
This live coverage has ended. For Wednesday’s live updates, click here.
Members of the NATO military alliance took a major step Tuesday in their bid to welcome Sweden and Finland to the fold. Delegations gathered in Brussels to sign “accession protocols,” after which NATO members must ratify the two Nordic countries’ accession to complete their formal joining of the bloc.
“This is truly a historic moment for Finland, for Sweden, for NATO — and for our shared security,” Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said. He said the alliance’s growth from 30 members to 32 would make nations stronger and safer. The signing ceremony follows a decision last week during a NATO summit in Madrid to admit Sweden and Finland, after some wrangling to allay bloc member Turkey’s objections.
The alliance’s enlargement is likely to prove a major irritation to Moscow, which has cited the specter of NATO expansion as justification for the invasion of Ukraine. Russian state media reported that work is underway to ensure the security of Russia’s borders.
Here’s what else to know
Brittany Kaiser burst into the limelight as a controversial Republican kingmaker — a young Chicagoan who, while running business development for Cambridge Analytica, helped marshal the data of tens of millions of Facebook users to press the 2016 presidential candidacy of Donald Trump.
Now Kaiser has taken on a sharply different role: helping to raise more than $100 million in cryptocurrency for Ukraine’s war against Russia.
Her involvement has been so essential to the country’s fight for democracy that Alex Bornyakov, Ukraine’s deputy minister of digital transformation, told The Washington Post his nation’s war effort would not have been the same without her. “Brittany has been a great friend — a great friend for me and for Ukraine,” he said in an interview, citing Kaiser’s strategic game-planning and social media connections as the country has battled Russia’s brutal invasion. “We’re really happy to have her.”
To many familiar with Kaiser’s story, championing Ukraine’s cause might seem like an unexpected transformation. At Cambridge Analytica, Kaiser not only worked closely with Trump adviser Stephen K. Bannon but also helped foster the company’s relationship with Kremlin-linked Russian energy firm Lukoil. But Kaiser says her new work fits with a redemption tale that started when she began leaking damning information about her former employer after it came under fire in 2018.
Pavlo Kyrylenko, governor of the eastern Ukrainian Donetsk province, urged the region’s residents — numbering more than 350,000 — to flee as shelling continued and military analysts warned of a focused Russian effort there.
Russian President Vladimir Putin declared victory in neighboring Luhansk province on Monday, a day after Ukrainian troops withdrew from the province’s last holdout city. Donetsk province, also part of Donbas region whose capture has been a Kremlin target since its focus shifted east, is bracing itself.
“The destiny of the whole country will be decided by the Donetsk region,” Kyrylenko told the Associated Press in Ukraine. He described shelling as “very chaotic” and lacking a “specific target.”
He said a central market in Slaviansk, as well as an area in Bakhmut including a school and other buildings, had recently come under Russian shelling.
“I call on everyone: evacuate!” he tweeted Tuesday, showing photos of the Slovyansk market in flames.
“To them civilians are just a target. Shelling will be repeated. Anyone who stays in Bakhmut is risking his own lives,” he wrote on Facebook on Tuesday.
More than 12 million Ukrainians have been displaced from their homes, according to the United Nations.
The war in Ukraine has given the relatively unsexy field of international law a moment in the spotlight. An unprecedented global effort to probe and prosecute war crimes is underway, with local and international investigators fanning out across the war-ravaged country to gather evidence of Russian atrocities — even as the fighting grinds on.
The focus on war crimes has also renewed interest in questions about the strengths and limitations of international law in constraining aggression and imposing accountability.
Three Russian soldiers have already been convicted in Ukrainian courts. Money and resources have poured in to help Ukrainian Prosecutor General Iryna Venediktova investigate the nearly 20,000 alleged breaches of the laws of war her team has registered. The International Criminal Court, which opened its own probe in March, sent its largest field deployment to Ukraine. An infusion of funding followed. And the United States dispatched Attorney General Merrick Garland to Ukraine, where he announced the creation of the Justice Department’s War Crimes Accountability Team, to be helmed by U.S. “Nazi hunter” Eli Rosenbaum.
Russia could impose a complete ban on cargo transit through the Baltic countries in retaliation for Lithuania’s recent round of restrictions linked to European Union sanctions, the governor of the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad said Tuesday.
“The last variant [of countermeasures] I voiced is a complete ban on imports and exports of any goods via the Baltics,” governor Anton Alikhanov said on Russia 24, a state-owned television network. “Thus, we prohibit the movement of goods toward the Baltics across Russia, with the exception of Kaliningrad.”
In June, Lithuania restricted the transit of steel, ferrous metals and other sanctioned goods to Kaliningrad, as E.U. sanctions took effect. The country said it was acting under guidelines set by the European Commission.
Kaliningrad, the headquarters of Russia’s Baltic Sea Fleet, is between Lithuania and Poland, which are both in the E.U. and NATO. It gets much of its supplies via Lithuania and Belarus.
Moscow says that the Lithuanian transit restrictions breached international agreements and threatened the country with countermeasures.
Alikhanov added that his latest proposal would be “an extreme, serious reciprocal measure.”
Russia threatens Lithuania for enforcing E.U. sanctions on Kaliningrad
The Moscow-installed authorities in the occupied areas of southeastern Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia region said Tuesday that they have reached an agreement to sell grain abroad — mainly to countries in the Middle East, Reuters reported. The region will get 300 rail cars to speed up grain supply from Russia this week in addition to deliveries by trucks.
According to Russian state news agency Tass, a contract has been set up to supply 150,000 metric tons of grain to Iran. Other countries that will benefit from this deal are Iraq and Saudi Arabia.
Ever since Russia invaded Ukraine in late February, Moscow has been accused of stealing grain from occupied territories in southern Ukraine. On Tuesday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said that 60 million metric tons of grain could be blocked from reaching consumers in the fall.
More than 2 million metric tons of grain are being harvested in the area, Yevgeniy Balitsky, military head of the Russian-occupied areas of Zaporizhzhia, said on Telegram.
After the “relatively rapid capture of Lysychansk” by Russian forces over the weekend, Russia continues to make “substantive progress” in its bid to seize control of Ukraine’s eastern Donbas region, according to a daily update from Britain’s Defense Ministry.
Unlike in earlier phases of the war, Russia appears to have “achieved reasonably effective co-ordination” between groupings of its armed forces under military leaders, it said Tuesday.
However, the intelligence update added that Ukrainian forces have probably withdrawn in good shape and in line with existing plans. “There is a realistic possibility that Ukrainian forces will now be able to fall back to a more readily defendable, straightened front line,” it said.
It predicted that further battles for Donbas would be characterized by “slow rates of advance” by Russian forces and the mass use of artillery “levelling towns and cities in the process.”
Latest Defence Intelligence update on the situation in Ukraine – 5 July 2022

Find out more about the UK government's response: https://t.co/NVYkvuvi87

🇺🇦 #StandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 pic.twitter.com/9YeKlckkjI
Russia fired missiles at a market and residential area in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk, damaging several houses and destroying one. At least two people were killed and seven injured, officials said. Two people were taken to the hospital as firefighters rushed to put out the flames.
Pavlo Kyrylenko, governor of the Donetsk region, called the strikes an act of “sheer terrorism.” In a Facebook post, he wrote that “Russians are deliberately targeting places where civilians congregate.”
Photos and videos from the scene show part of the ground-level market in flames. It’s unclear how many people were in the area at the time or what type of munitions were used.
Tuesday marks the eighth anniversary of Ukraine recapturing Slovyansk from Russian proxy forces of the self-proclaimed separatist Donetsk People’s Republic.
Russia is inching closer to securing complete control over the eastern Luhansk region and is setting its sights on Slovyansk as a gateway to capturing the rest of the Donetsk region. Luhansk and Donetsk make up Ukraine’s industrial heartland of Donbas.
Yum Brands, the Louisville-based conglomerate behind KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, is a step closer to fully extricating itself from Russia.
On Tuesday, more than four months after Russia invaded Ukraine, the company announced it had transferred ownership of all its Pizza Hut franchises to an unnamed local operator, who plans to rebrand those locations with a “non-Yum” concept. Yum Brands also said it is in the “advanced stages” of transferring ownership of its KFC restaurants in Russia. It suspended all new investments there on March 7.
“This builds on the Company’s prior actions to suspend operations of all company-owned restaurants, halt all investment and restaurant development efforts, and redirect any profits from Russia operations to humanitarian efforts,” reads an unsigned statement on the Yum Brands website.
When the sale of the KFC franchises is complete, the company “intends to fully exit from Russia,” according to the statement.
Like some of its peers, Yum Brands’ full exit from the country is complicated by the fact that the vast majority of its 53,000 global restaurants are owned and operated by franchisees. There were about 1,000 KFCs and 50 Pizza Huts in Russia before operations were suspended, according to a company news release.
On Tuesday, Russia’s lower house of parliament approved legislation that would force businesses to produce whatever the government wants, at a price and time frame set by it.
The legislation, among two measures that cleared the State Duma, is expected to pass swiftly through both houses of Russia’s rubber-stamp parliament before being signed into law by President Vladimir Putin.
Since its invasion of Ukraine, Russia has struggled to sustain personnel and equipment, with Western countries imposing broad sanctions and supplying Ukraine with weapons.
Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov said it was necessary to “optimize” the work of the military-industrial complex and related enterprises. He said the legislation would allow Russia to mobilize its economy to support what Moscow calls its “special military operation” against Ukraine.
“This does not mean that any enterprise — small, medium-size businesses, any other — will be forcibly involved in the implementation of state defense order measures,” he said, noting that they would not affect companies not producing goods for the military. “There is no need for this.”
One of the two bills said the state could impose “special economic measures” during military operations, requiring firms to supply goods and services to the military. The second bill would give the government authority to alter the working hours of businesses supplying the goods — employees may be asked to work at night, on weekends and on holidays — with the possibility of no annual leave.
Vyacheslav Volodin, chairman of the State Duma, said discussions on the measures would continue behind closed doors on Wednesday.
A Ukrainian woman has stoked national pride after winning the Fields Medal, an award sometimes likened to a Nobel Prize in mathematics.
Maryna Viazovska received the Fields Medal on Tuesday in a ceremony in Helsinki for her work on number theory and a sphere-packing geometric problem. “The optimal solution depends very much on the dimension,” Viazovska says in a video.
She dedicated her win to Ukraine, where much of her family still lives. Viazovska is a professor and chair of number theory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne.
“She resolved a question that had stumped mathematicians for more than four centuries,” her college said in a statement. Previously, the problem had been solved for only three dimensions or fewer, and she solved it for eight and 24 dimensions, it said.
Viazovska is only the second woman to win the award, after Iranian-born Maryam Mirzakhani in 2014. The Fields Medal was created in 1936 and is awarded every four years to one or more mathematicians under the age of 40.
Viazovska, who was born in Kyiv, said she has “liked mathematics since my school days” in Ukraine. “It always seemed like the most straightforward subject, and since I liked it, I spent more time on it and eventually became better at math than other subjects.”
She said she is driven by problem-solving, which she described as being akin to “doing a jigsaw puzzle,” and by understanding abstract concepts.
Ukrainian Maryna Viazovska received a very prestigious Fields medal (equivalent of Nobel prize for mathematics).

Congratulations!

Ukrainians are not only brave warriors – they are very smart. We will win and restore Ukraine, no doubt! pic.twitter.com/9OKWbZOk1U
Swedish furniture giant Ikea launched an online fire sale in Russia on Tuesday to sell surplus inventory, weeks after announcing it would scale down business operations in the country and sell all four of its factories there.
The retailer, which employs 15,000 people in Russia, shut its 17 bricks-and-mortar stores there in March after Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine. Ikea also suspended operations at its factories in Russia, which were hit hard by disruptions in the global supply chain and transportation difficulties.
Ikea is one of more than 40 companies to exit the Russian market, but it is the only one to walk back on halting business entirely.
The fire sale drew heavy traffic on ikea.ru. Some shoppers were directed to a waiting page before they could fully access the site. According to the Reuters news agency, the site experienced some technical issues around midday Moscow time — preventing shoppers from adding items to their baskets.
“For technical reasons, accepting orders through the basket on the website is temporarily unavailable,” Ikea announced on the website. “We are working on solving the problem.”
Ingka Group, the owner of Ikea, said in June that the stores would return to Russia one day but did not provide a time frame.
Ikea said it will continue to pay its staff in Russia until the end of August.
WNBA star Brittney Griner, who has been detained in Russia since February on drug charges, wrote a letter to President Biden that was delivered to the White House on Monday morning, her sports agency said.
In the letter, Griner, 31, expressed fear over not knowing how long she will be detained and urged Biden to work to release her and other Americans detained abroad.
“As I sit here in a Russian prison, alone with my thoughts and without the protection of my wife, family, friends, Olympic jersey, or any accomplishments, I’m terrified I might be here forever,” Griner wrote in an excerpt of the letter shared by Wasserman, a talent agency that represents the basketball star.
“I realize you are dealing with so much, but please don’t forget about me and the other American Detainees,” she added. “Please do all you can to bring us home. I voted for the first time in 2020 and I voted for you. I believe in you.”
Ukraine’s rebuilding and recovery needs to start now, President Volodymyr Zelensky said in an address to his nation.
“Colossal funds” are required to rebuild critical infrastructure, including schools, hospitals and waste processing plants. Huge sums will also be needed for the smooth return of welfare services and “normal economic life,” he said in a nightly video address late Monday.
The president of the war-torn country said “tens of thousands” of homes have been destroyed across the country, especially in the south, and that “thousands of enterprises are out of business.”
“That is why the recovery of Ukraine is not only about what needs to be done later, after our victory, but also about what needs to be done at this time,” he said. “The reconstruction of our state is not just the restoration of the walls that we had. … Ukraine must become the freest, most modern and safest country in Europe,” he added.
On Monday, Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal estimated at the Ukraine Recovery Conference in Lugano, Switzerland, that his country needs $750 billion for a sweeping three-stage rebuilding and recovery plan.
Zelensky said fighting continues in the south and east, particularly in the Donbas and Kharkiv regions, as he called on his troops to “break” the hold of Russian forces.
VIENNA — “Polizei!” barked the officers who stormed a third-floor apartment in the Austrian capital, moving to intercept a thickset man standing near a kitchen nook. The suspect — a long-serving official in Austria’s security services — sprang toward his cellphone and tried to break it in two, according to Austrian police reports.
The phone data from last year’s raid, along with a laptop, USB sticks and a mother lode of documents, are now proving critical to an explosive case that has gained newfound urgency in the aftermath of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and it is fueling questions about the extent to which Moscow’s influence came to permeate this European nation.
Egisto Ott managed undercover agents in the Austrian domestic security service and served in Turkey and Italy as an intelligence officer. He is suspected of having sold state secrets to Russia, as well as providing information on perceived enemies of the Kremlin in the West, according to European security officials and Austrian investigative documents.
The still-developing Ott case, security officials say, is one of many internal problems that contributed to last year’s dissolution of Austria’s domestic intelligence agency — the BVT — and has led other European agencies to curtail their links with Vienna or cut it out of intelligence sharing on some matters relating to Russia.
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